Wilson (2017)

There are just some films that speak to the individual on a personal level. Many films are made to be relatable to a vast majority of people, but there are also films that are made to appeal to a specific kind of people – and Wilson is one such film. Now I won’t pretend like…

The Hours (2002)

I recently read Virginia Woolf’s beautiful, poignant and highly influential novel, Mrs. Dalloway, and needless to say I adored it. I am firmly in the school of fans of Postmodern literature, so to read an undeniably Modernist novel such as Mrs. Dalloway allows for one to see where the likes of David Foster Wallace, Don…

Ida (2013)

Ida is a film that has a lot going for it – it is a picturesque piece of filmmaking, with some amazing cinematography. It has two very impressive lead performances. It makes great use of black-and-white photography, and it is quite a unique film. However, Ida is a film that suffers from the same symptom…

The Gleaners and I (2000)

The documentary is undeniably one of the most popular forms of filmmaking, because there is something about the truthful conveyance of real events that attract audiences, as evident by the popularity in true-crime documentaries, and stories of amazing human feats of strength or endurance. We are drawn to these stories because it feels like we…

Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

Punch-Drunk Love is a bizarre film for a number of reasons. First and foremost, I will just reiterate how much I adore Paul Thomas Anderson. I will never pass up the opportunity to heap enormous amounts of praise on him. His worst film is even better than the best films of other filmmakers. Having said…

One Week and a Day (2016)

Death and grieving is not a stranger to cinema. Many films are fascinated with the idea of exploring death and how the loved ones who are left behind deal with the death. It is also a very sensitive subject, because its likely that each and every one of us has lost a loved one, and…

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

What do you get if you combine one of the most popular actors of his generation with one of the greatest, and put them in a Western directed by the man who defined the genre and left an indelible impression on cinema forever? You get The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, a film that combines…

Oldboy (2003)

The year was 2004. The event was the 2004 Cannes Film Festival, and the man was Quentin Tarantino, who was serving as President of the Cannes Film Festival jury. Tarantino is a personal hero of mine (as if you couldn’t surmise that already), and he decided to give the Grand Prix to Oldboy, an ultra-violent…

A Serious Man (2009)

It is quite a surreal and amazing feeling when you have expectations for a film that aren’t particularly high, and it ends up being one of the most dazzling experiences one has ever had. Honestly, I initially didn’t think too much of A Serious Man. I am not sure why I wasn’t that keen on…

Blade Runner (1982)

In my continuing (and eternal) quest to fill in cinematic blind spots, one at a time, I decided to take a journey into the future and watch Blade Runner, a film known for being one of the definitive works of science fiction cinema. It is actually pretty bizarre that I had never previously seen Blade…

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

There are some films that are just so universally beloved, they become legendary in how loved they are. Obviously there are a tremendous amount of great films, but very rarely are there films that achieve the status of being utter masterpieces as well as being almost perfectly adored by everyone from cinephiles to casual film…

The Master (2012)

I truly believe Paul Thomas Anderson is the greatest filmmaker working today. As film lovers, we need to recognize the fact that we live in the era of Anderson, and know that we are in the presence of a cinematic genius. Even though I have watched all of his films no less than three times…