The House (2022)

Here’s a novel concept – The House is one of the best horror films of recent years, and a film that is only going to grow in estimation as time goes on. Less of a singular film, and more the product of an artistic collective, whereby it is composed of three distinct films, each written…

Scent of a Woman (1974)

While most people will be more aware of the 1992 film that saw Al Pacino finally complete his transformation in a full parody of himself, Scent of a Woman (Italian: Profumo di donna) is actually one of the definitive entries into a genre that saw countless incredible filmmakers working to tell stories of ordinary people…

The Tragedy of Macbeth (2021)

It would seem almost inappropriate to start this discussion without mentioning my undying belief that Macbeth is the finest work in the history of English literature, a contentious but not entirely uncommon belief. William Shakespeare wrote several works that have remained resonant for centuries, many of them being the subject of countless adaptations, whether it…

Sexy Beast (2000)

After many years of honing his craft as one of the most creative and reliable directors of music videos (an artform he helped define), Jonathan Glazer took the leap into long-form filmmaking, in the form of Sexy Beast, his feature-length directorial debut. He may have only made three films to date, but each one of…

The Lost Daughter (2021)

There are some films that have all the potential to be great – whether featuring an excellent cast, a strong script (especially one adapted from a writer known for being one of the most important of their generation) and gorgeous landscapes are all usually components of very good films. Yet, some films can squander these…

Sawdust and Tinsel (1953)

Depending on how you look at it, life is a comedy masquerading as a tragedy, or vice versa. This is the foundation for Sawdust and Tinsel (Swedish: Gycklarnas afton), the ambitious character-driven drama that serves as an early entry into the long and prolific career of the iconic Ingmar Bergman, who may have still been…

Murphy’s Romance (1985)

Whatever the people behind the creation of Murphy’s Romance did, they somehow managed to make one of the most exhilarating screen romances in the history of cinema, and yet made it seem so effortlessly easy. Perhaps its the presence of Martin Ritt, the legendary director who presided over the adaptation of the novella by Max…

The Suitcase of Dreams (1953)

If there is one subject that cinema loves more than love or war, it would be the art of filmmaking itself. So many directors from the age of the silent era to those working today, have made films that reflect their admiration and adoration for the medium that has allowed them to explore their own…

Roxanne (1987)

It’s an iconic image – Steve Martin sporting a prosthetic nose, on the end of which is perched an adorable yellow canary, as he looks into oblivion, deep in despair at the fact that his appearance weighs him down and prevents his character from ever finding love, since it’s impossible to encounter anyone who can…

Laughs in America: A Comedic Voyage Through the United States

Earlier this week, I reviewed Albert Brooks’ groundbreaking comedy, Lost in America, where he and Julie Hagerty embark on a lifelong trip around the United States of America. Of course, the most hilarious part of the film (and the hook) is that the duo never actually manage to get that far, spending most of the…