Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

While there was never an era where Hitchcock wasn’t producing work of an incredibly high standard (with the exception of a couple of less-successful works peppered between masterpieces), his later career was defined by his status as a master of his craft, which established him as one of the most important filmmakers of his generation,…

The Big Sleep (1946)

The sight of two shadowy figures in a room lit only by the dim glow of a desk lamp and the tips of their cigarettes – there are few images more memorable than this one, to the point where the entire film noir genre has been centred around such ideas (amongst others). The reason we’re…

Dark Passage (1947)

The 1940s were inarguably the peak of film noir – the 1930s featured several thrillers that laid the groundwork, while the 1950s were all about experimenting with form and content, continuously searching for new ways to explore the genre and represent its many fascinating conventions. Squarely in the middle of these two eras was one…

Railroaded! (1947)

One of the wonderful by-products of early film noir and gangster storytelling is that the viewer learns an abundance of new terms and concepts that may have gone out of fashion, but remain eternal, preserved in the cinema that was designed to entertain audiences of yesteryear, but have somehow managed to remain relevant until the…

Nightmare Alley (1947)

At its peak, film noir was one of the most popular genres – whether extracted from the wildly entertaining pages of pulp fiction novels that were consumed at a rapid pace by readers of all ages, or more high-concept, experimental works that saw various filmmakers taking on more original ideas, these films were extremely popular,…

Out of the Past (1947)

Memory is a tricky concept – the events of the past tend to take on more grotesque shapes when it comes to being relayed, especially as time has gone on and we start to subconsciously fashion them to be reminiscent of our own idealistic agenda. For a film that spends roughly half of its already…

They Live by Night (1948)

They Live by Night represented a start for a couple of people in the film industry, namely being the first leading role for Farley Granger, who had previously had minor roles in a couple of smaller wartime times (with this coming in the same year as his star-making performance in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope), as well…

The Third Man (1949)

Any work of art that carries the label of being one of the greatest works of all time is bound to result in some disappointment – but somehow, when it comes to calling The Third Man the greatest British film ever made, this somehow feels like a vast understatement. Carol Reed didn’t only make arguably…

In a Lonely Place (1950)

If there was ever a filmmaker who knew the merit of a story well told, it would be Nicholas Ray, whose career was as diverse as it was prolific. During his peak, he directed some of the greatest films ever to be produced by Hollywood’s major studios, working in a range of genres that consolidated…

Nightmare Alley (2021)

Despite being one of the more cherished directors working today, Guillermo del Toro’s films may be considered an acquired taste. With the exception of a couple of films that are almost universally praised and adored, his work is quite divisive, which is less of an implication of him being a director that doesn’t register with…