It (2017)

You can say a fair amount about Stephen King. The prolific horror author has written a tremendous amount of books, many of them sadly being forgettable and oftentimes just dull. However, my own personal opinion tends towards believing that King has written two bona fide masterpieces that stand as great pieces of literature – The…

Blue Velvet (1986)

By this point, I don’t even need to explain that I adore David Lynch. Every review of his work I write ends up being just a radical praising of his career as cinema’s greatest surrealist. Yet, here we are again, and today I’m going to be reviewing arguably his most important film, Blue Velvet. The…

Beatriz at Dinner (2017)

Perhaps the best way to describe Beatriz at Dinner is to consider it as a mumblecore dramedy as made by Darren Aronofsky and Terrence Malick. That isn’t to praise Beatriz at Dinner as anything close to what those two filmmakers have made, but there are several themes in this film that locates it alongside the…

Paris, Texas (1984)

I first read about Paris, Texas years ago, when I was still a young burgeoning cinephile. I read how it is considered one of the most heartbreakingly beautiful films ever made, and a film that takes a unique look at the United States of America. My question is this: why is it that I waited…

Six Shooter (2004)

Six Shooter, the first film by genius playwright and filmmaker Martin McDonagh, has absolutely everything you could want from a film – philosophical conversations, the conflict between characters, family tragedy, police shootouts and an exploding cow. It is also only 27 minutes long, which proves that a film doesn’t need to be very long to…

Portrait of Jason (1967)

In about two weeks, we will be celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of one of the most audacious and influential documentaries premiering at the New York Film Festival. Portrait of Jason is one of the most unheralded films ever made, a documentary that is so astounding in its simplicity, but so broad in its multitude of…

Harold and Maude (1971)

Each and every one of us has that one film (or a few films) that just lift our spirits when we are in need of a good pick-me-up. For me, the only film I can always turn to in order to cheer me up is Hal Ashby’s seminal cult classic, Harold and Maude. It is…

Lemon (2017)

Who better to make a film about a middle-aged, mediocre white Jewish man than a young, talented black woman? This very obscure concept is the central driving force behind Lemon, the first feature-length film from wunderkind filmmaker and auteur Janicza Bravo, which she wrote with her husband Brett Gelman, who also plays the lead role…

Lost Highway (1997)

Critics love David Lynch. Cinephiles love David Lynch. Casual movie-goers love David Lynch (or at least enjoyed Twin Peaks). Essentially everyone loves David Lynch, and many people will gladly tell you that he is the greatest living filmmaker. It is a fact I am proud to disseminate at every possible opportunity, including this one. However,…

David Brent: Life on the Road (2016)

Who doesn’t love Ricky Gervais? Apparently, quite a few people because he’s one of the most divisive comedians working today. However, for everyone who fails to see what an absolute genius Gervais is, I compensate for their lack of faith in his extraordinary skills as a performance by being an unabashed, adoring fan. Like many…

The Big Sick (2017)

Independent cinema has gone a long way since its early days of obscurity, and it continues to be surprising and manages to grow exponentially constantly. One of this year’s best independent films is The Big Sick, a film that may not be overly original or completely audacious in execution, but for what it lacks in…

The Beaches of Agnès (2008)

“What is cinema? Light coming from somewhere captured by images more or less colorful” – these are the concluding words to the penultimate scene of Agnès Varda’s incredible visual essay, the documentary The Beaches of Agnès (French: Les plages d’Agnès). I have been an admirer of Varda for an incredibly long time, and one of…